Corporate Program past event

Serious Fun: How Toys “R” Us Became Number One in Japan

April 9, 2003
Serious Fun: How Toys “R” Us Became Number One in Japan

Corporate Luncheon
12 – 2 pm

Read the Event Summary.

Speaker
John Barbour, President, Toys “R” Us International

Presider
Alfred R. Kahn,
President & CEO, 4Kids Entertainment, Inc.

Toys “R” Us opened the first store in Arakawa-oki, Japan in December 1991, a time when few non-Japanese retail companies were even considering operating in Japan. At that time, the industry was reluctant to import merchandise from the United States, Europe or China. The distribution channels were dominated by wholesalers, adding costs and resulting in extremely high consumer retail prices on children’s goods. Toys “R” Us developed direct purchasing relationships with the Japanese suppliers and augmented its product offering with merchandise imported from around the world. Toys “R” Us worked closely with the United States Department of Commerce and the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry to liberalize the Large-Scale Retail Store Law.

In April 2000, Toys “R” Us – Japan issued its first initial public stock offering and in November of that year celebrated the 100th store opening. In December 2002, with the first international opening of the Babies “R” Us format, another milestone was achieved. Toys “R” Us – Japan is now one of Japan’s premier children’s retailers with 134 Toys “R” Us outlets and 1 Babies “R” Us store. John Barbour, President of Toys “R” Us International, discusses the unique features of Japan’s retail landscape and the company’s prospects for growth in Asia.

Agenda
12 – 12:30 pm       Registration & reception
12:30 – 1              Luncheon
1 – 2                     Program


Tickets: Corporate members are entitled to a designated number of free admissions to this event, based on their company’s current membership level. These reservations must be made at least 48 hours prior to the event. Additional corporate registrants pay the discounted corporate member rate of $45 for lunch and lecture, $10 for lecture only.
Nonmember tickets: $65 for lunch and lecture, $15 lecture only.

Refunds will not be issued after noon, two business days before the program, but substitutes are welcome. No shows will be billed.

  • April 9, 2003
  • 12:00 pm